Can swans fly?
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Q:

Can swans fly?

A:

Quick Answer

Swans are capable of flight. In fact, the swans that are often seen around marshes, lakes and ponds are able to fly only 60 days after hatching.

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Full Answer

These birds, commonly known as mute swans, originally bred in the British Isles, north-central Europe and north-central Asia were introduced to America by settlers. Though they do not follow mass-migration patterns in their new home, European and Asian birds may travel as far as North Africa, the Near East, India and Korea to winter. Interestingly, though mute swans are generally silent, the sound of the their wings during flight can be rather loud.

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