Q:

What do common carp eat?

A:

Common carp eat insects, aquatic worms, earthworms, snails, crayfish, rotifers, mussels, water plants, algae, dead plant parts and fish eggs. They skim the bottoms of bodies of water, sucking in food and mud then spitting out what they don't consume. The uprooting of plants and fish egg consumption harm other fish populations.

Common carp inhabit streams, rivers, lakes and ponds rich with aquatic greenery. They can grow up to 30 inches long and weigh as much as 60 pounds. Distinctive traits include whisker-like barbels on the upper lip and a large dorsal fin.

Common carp are not native to America. This food source was introduced into the United States and originates from Asia.

Sources:

  1. fcps.edu

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