Q:

Are crane flies venomous?

A:

Crane flies are not venomous, and their bodies are not toxic. Many species do not eat as adults and lack mouth parts capable of piercing skin. The larvae can be agricultural pests, but the adults are harmless.

Crane flies look like oversized mosquitoes and can reach 60 millimeters in length. The larvae live either in wet and dry soils or in fresh or salt water. Many eat microflora, algae and decomposing organic matter, but some are predatory. Pest species usually damage the roots of plants. Crane flies provide food for many other creatures, including birds, other insects, spiders, fish, amphibians and mammals.


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