Q:

How did dinosaurs die?

A:

There are multiple theories as to why dinosaurs died out, such as asteroid impact, volcanic activity, and climate change. There are many theories because none has been proven to be 100 percent certain as the reason for the dinosaurs’ demise.

The asteroid impact theory suggests that dinosaurs died in a massive extinction as a result of a large asteroid hitting the planet. Evidence that supports this theory includes the presence of a metal called iridium in places where dinosaur fossils have been found. Iridium is a rare metal that is not commonly found on Earth, but is a common material in asteroids. Scientists believe the impact from the asteroid could have lead to the development of tsunamis and forest fires, as well as creating a layer of dust and ash that blocked out the light from the sun, plunging the planet into darkness and cold.

Other theories suggest that there was an increase in volcanic activity around the time that dinosaurs went extinct and they believe this activity would have destroyed habitats and pushed enough ash into the atmosphere to affect the climate and destroy vegetation.

The climate change theory states that Earth's climate gradually became cooler and drier, and that dinosaurs could not adapt to the change, leading to their gradual extinction.

Religious theories support the idea that dinosaurs died during the great flood in Noah's time.

While the topic of how dinosaurs went extinct is still up for debate, discoveries of new fossils offer more information about how they lived.

Learn More

Related Questions

  • Q:

    When did dinosaurs become extinct?

    A:

    Dinosaurs became extinct about 65 million years ago. This extinction event occurred between the Cretaceous and Tertiary periods and wiped out about 50 percent of all other organisms then living on the planet.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What do you do if you find a dinosaur bone?

    A:

    Individuals who believe that they have found a fossilized dinosaur bone in an outdoor area should avoid touching it and instead take a photo and make note of its exact location using a map before making contact with a natural history museum such as the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C. However, this procedure is not legally binding, particularly if the fossil is discovered on private land, though moral obligation may tell a different story. In the United States, individuals who find a fossil on their land are not required to report or hand it over to any authority.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What are the names of water dinosaurs?

    A:

    Though scientists haven't yet found a true dinosaur that lived in the water, there were aquatic animals that lived at the time of the dinosaurs and are considered dinosaur-like. Some of their names are Plesiosaurus, Elasmosaurus, Macroplata, Kronosaurus and Peloneustes. These animals lived in the Mesozoic era. Other water-dwelling faux-dinosaurs were Ichthyosaurus, Temnodontosaurus, Stenopterygius and Ophthalmosaurus. These lived from the middle Triassic period to the early Cretaceous period.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What type of dinosaur was Littlefoot in "The Land Before Time"?

    A:

    Littlefoot is a brontosaurus, more properly called an apatosaurus. National Public Radio explains that the brontosaurus never actually existed. The first apatosaurus was originally reconstructed with the wrong skull. When complete apatosaurus skeletons with the correct skulls were later identified, they were mistakenly given a new name, the brontosaurus.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore