Q:

What is a dog's habitat?

A:

Quick Answer

Dogs are domesticated animals that generally live in the same habitats as humans. However, wild dogs live out in the open and sleep under trees where they can keep an eye on their surroundings.

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What is a dog's habitat?
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Full Answer

Wild dogs do not have permanent dens like other animals. While some animals create dens to live in year-round, wild female dogs tend to only create dens for sheltering puppies after giving birth. Once the puppies are around 12 weeks old, the den is no longer needed. Wildlife and starvation are the biggest threats to wild dogs. However, domesticated dogs are threatened by poisoning, homelessness and other animals.

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