Q:

How do dolphins mate?

A:

Quick Answer

Dolphins mate in much the same way as humans by expressing sexual attraction and desire, and when the time is right, the male enters the female to deposit his sperm. Unlike human mating, the actual dolphin mating process only lasts a few seconds.

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Full Answer

When it's time for dolphins to mate, the male begins searching for a suitable mate. He makes clicking sounds to attract the female he has his sights set on. If the female responds to his advances, she will begin vocalizations and exhibiting body language to let him know she is attracted to him. This is known as courting. During the final stages of courting, the female will allow the male to touch her and they will bite each other's fins and rub each other's body to demonstrate mutual attraction. The courting ritual may last a few days or can drag out for weeks.

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