How fast can penguins swim?
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Q:

How fast can penguins swim?

A:

Quick Answer

According to Falklands Conservation, penguins can swim at speeds of up to 17 mph; however, they normally average between 9 and 15 mph. Penguins can also dive further and swim faster than any other bird.

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Full Answer

According to About.com, penguins jump in shallow arcs in the air while swimming, which is a practice known as "porpoising." This practice covers their plumage with tiny air bubbles and allows them to reduce friction while swimming and avoid predators. Some scientists theorize that penguins engage in this practice simply because they are happy. Penguins feed on fish, shrimp, krill and other crustaceans, and their superior underwater eyesight allows them to spot prey even in cloudy or murky water.

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Related Questions

  • Q:

    What do penguins eat?

    A:

    Penguins generally eat fish, squid and krill, though their diet depends on the species. Generally, penguins living close to the equator eat more fish, while penguins in arctic climates rely on squid and krill for sustenance.

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  • Q:

    How long do penguins live?

    A:

    The length of a penguins life varies based on the breed, but the average penguin lives in the wild for 10 to 20 years. Both the Emperor penguin and Adelie penguin live on Antarctica.

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    How do penguins behave?

    A:

    Defenders of Wildlife explains that penguins are social birds that live together in groups. Although some penguins are known to go hunting for food by themselves, it is much more common to see them swimming and feeding in groups. During the penguins' breeding season, they form large groups known as rookeries. These rookeries usually include thousands of penguins living together.

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  • Q:

    Why do penguins huddle together to keep warm?

    A:

    Penguins huddle together to keep warm as a way to shield their bodies from the full force of the cold weather experienced in Antarctica. While huddled, penguins exchange positions so that every colony member takes a turn at forming the outer perimeter, where exposure to the cold is greatest.

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