Q:

What is a female cow called?

A:

Although cattle are often collectively referred to as cows, the word cow specifically refers to females of the cattle species that have given birth to at least one calf. Young female cattle that have not yet given birth to a calf are referred to as heifers.

The word calf is used to refer to young cattle of both sexes until the point at which they are weaned. After weaning, they are known as yearlings until they reach the age of 2. At that point, the females become known as heifers until they give birth and become known as cows. Male cattle ages 2 and older are known as bulls. If a male is castrated, it is called a steer.

Learn More

Related Questions

  • Q:

    How big is a cow?

    A:

    Adult size for cows can vary significantly due to breed and sex, although large breeds can weigh 1,400 pounds or more. Smaller breeds weigh between 600 and 1,000 pounds. Bulls can grow over 3,000 pounds in rare occasions.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Do cows have feelings?

    A:

    There is evidence suggesting that cows do have feelings. As herd animals, they have extensive social relationships and may experience emotions such as stress, fear and pleasure.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Why do cows lay down?

    A:

    Cows lie down to ruminate, a process that increases their milk production. Cows can lie down for up to 14 hours a day, although only a half an hour of that time is spent sleeping.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Are there boy cows?

    A:

    The term "cow" is only used for female cattle. Male, or boy, cattle are called bulls or steers. When born, a male is referred to as a "bull calf." If the bull calf is not castrated, it grows into a bull.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore