Q:

What is a female frog called?

A:

Quick Answer

There is no designated name for female or male frogs. However, frog offspring are normally referred to as tadpoles or polliwogs before they enter the next stage of metamorphosis. A large group of frogs is referred to as an army.

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What is a female frog called?
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Full Answer

It is difficult to tell male and female frogs apart. All of the frog's reproductive organs are located inside the body. However, during mating season a frog's sex can be discerned by specific behavioral and physical characteristics, such as croaking in males, the appearance of large rough patches on the feet of males, and the general increase in size of females.

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