Q:

Does glue come from horses?

A:

Some glue comes from horses. It has become a less popular manufacturing process as synthetic options have become available. Elmer's, one of the largest suppliers of glue, has stated that none of its glue is derived from animals.

Horses are not the only animals that were traditionally used to make glue. Pigs and cattle have been used to create glue as well. The collagen in the animals' bones and connective tissues is processed and turned into a sticky gelatin substance.

Animals have been used to create glue for thousands of years. The earliest known instance dates back over 8,000 years on artifacts found at Nahal Hemar Cave in Israel.

Sources:

  1. slate.com

Is this answer helpful?

Similar Questions

  • Q:

    What is a group of horses called?

    A:

    A group of horses is called a "team" or a "harras." If all the horses in a group are colts, "rag" can be used, and a group of ponies is called a "string."

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Are horses herbivores?

    A:

    Horses are herbivores because they eat primary producers. Primary producers are organisms that are able to produce their own food using chemical energy or energy from the sun.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How fast can horses run?

    A:

    The average horse can run at about 30 miles per hour. Horses that are bred to run long distances have been recorded to run up to 40 miles per hour. Quarter horses bred for racing short distances have been reported to run as fast as 50 miles per hour. The highest race speed is recorded at 43.97 miles per hour by Winning Brew in Grantville, PA. on May 14, 2008.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Are horses ruminants?

    A:

    Horses are not ruminants, although they are capable of digesting cellulose and other plant-based materials despite lacking a forestomach. The fermentation of plant matter is done in the large intestine, which in horses is massive and complex.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore