Q:

What is a great white shark?

A:

A great white shark, or Carcharodon carcharias, is a large shark that inhabits the coastal waters of all oceans. It is the largest macro-predatory fish on Earth.

Great white sharks average approximately 3.6 meters in length, though they can reach up to 6.1 meters and weigh up to 5,000 pounds. The International Union for Conservation of Nature considers the great white shark to be a vulnerable species. Its reputation for being one of the world's greatest predators has made it a favorite target of sport fishermen. Once thought to inhabit primarily warm, temperate waters, it is now known to inhabit all waters.


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  • Q:

    What is the classification of a great white shark?

    A:

    The scientific name of the great white shark is Carcharodon carcharias, of which it is the only living member in its genus. The great white belongs to the family Lamnidae, or mackerel sharks. Mackerel sharks are characterized by their heavily-built, torpedo-shaped bodies, large teeth and prominent gill openings.

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    What is the scientific name for a great white shark?

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    The scientific name for the great white shark is Carcharodon carcharias. The great white has been given other names over the years, according to the Florida Museum of Natural History, including Carcharias lamnia, Carcharias verus, Carcharodon smithii, Carcharodon rondeletii, Carcharias atwoodi, Carcharias maso and Carcharodon albimors

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    What is the lifespan of the great white shark?

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    The lifespan of the great white shark is about 70 years, according to a study by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. It was previously believed that great whites lived to be only 30.

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    Why is the great white shark endangered?

    A:

    The great white shark is endangered from years of being hunted by people for its fins and teeth. Great white sharks also get overhunted as trophies in sport fishing, according to the World Wildlife Fund. Another danger is accidental catching by commercial fisheries.

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