Q:

How often do great white sharks eat?

A:

A 2013 study, detailed by Discovery, explains that great whites have a faster metabolism than previously thought and probably feed every few days. The study indicated that the amount of energy required by a great white was equivalent to eating a seal pup every three days.

The same 2013 study asserts that great whites consume approximately 66 pounds of mammal blubber every 12 to 15 days. These apex predators mainly prey on other aquatic carnivores, such as seals and sea lions, but occasionally eat other fish or sea turtles. Over the course of a year, a great white can consume up to 11 tons of food.


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