Q:

What is a grub worm?

A:

Quick Answer

Grub worms, also called lawn grubs, are white worm-like pests that live in the soil. They are the larval form of the adult Japanese beetle, sometimes called the June beetle. Each larva is about ½ inch long with a small brown head.

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What is a grub worm?
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Full Answer

Grub worms eat the roots of turf grass and ornamental plants. Grub worms turn lawns brown and attract predatory animals, such as skunks and raccoons, that further damage lawns. There are chemical and natural fertilizers that control grub worm populations. Nematodes are the natural enemies of grub worms, but they can only affect young larvae. Grubs are active from the early spring through the early fall.

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Related Questions

  • Q:

    What can you use to kill grub worms?

    A:

    Grub worms can be killed by both natural methods and by purchasing grub worm treatments. Natural methods include applying milky spores or neem oil to the affected area or adding nematodes to the soil. Purchased treatments include Dylox, Merit and Mach-2.

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  • Q:

    How do you build a worm farm?

    A:

    Build a worm farm by outfitting an opaque, vented storage container with shredded newspaper, a few handfuls of soil, crushed egg shells, and fruit and vegetable scraps. Add the worms, cover the container and add more scraps as the worms consume the original food.

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  • Q:

    What are the key differences between a hook worm and a round worm?

    A:

    One of the key differences between roundworms and hookworms is that roundworms live freely in the intestines, while hookworms latch onto the intestinal walls. Both primarily affect pets and can be passed to humans.

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  • Q:

    How do you make a worm shocker?

    A:

    An effective worm shocker can be easily made with a few common household supplies, including an extension cord, electrical tape, wire nuts and a metal rod. Although using electricity to drive worms out of the ground after rainfall can be much easier than shoveling soil, homemade electrical devices carry risks and should not be handled by the inexperienced or those with heart issues.

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