Q:

Where do grubs come from?

A:

Grubs are the larvae of various beetle species of the supergroup Scarabaeoidea. They hatch from eggs laid in the soil and can be serious lawn and garden pests.

Grubs normally live beneath the ground and feed on plant roots. They do the most damage in mid to late summer but can be controlled by insecticides, especially in July and August when they are immature and most vulnerable. Most grubs prefer moist soil, so reducing watering during the hot summer months can decrease grub populations. Tiny parasitic worms called nematodes also provide effective grub control. Milky spore disease is another biological control but works only on the grubs of Japanese beetles.


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