Q:

What is a hawk's lifespan?

A:

Quick Answer

A hawk's lifespan depends on the species, as there are many different types. The most commonly seen hawk, the red-tailed hawk, has a lifespan ranging from 13 to 21 years.

Know More
What is a hawk's lifespan?
Credit: Marie Hale CC-BY-2.0

Full Answer

Red-tailed hawks are monogamous and usually mate for life. To find a mate, male red-tailed hawks perform complicated aerobatic displays, such as soaring high in the sky in pairs and diving extremely fast. They also grab each others' talons and dive together. When they have chosen a mate, they build a nest high in the tops of the trees and lay between one and five eggs. The male and female hawks take turns incubating them.

Learn more about Birds

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What is the lifespan of a canary?

    A:

    A pet canary can live approximately 15 years. A canary's lifespan depends on its gender, level of care, breeding activity and basic safety practices. Male canaries tend to live longer than female canaries. Female canaries used for regular breeding usually live only about six years.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is the lifespan of a seagull?

    A:

    The natural lifespan of a seagull is 20 years or more. However, since seagulls live in the wild, they can be eaten by predators such as weasels, foxes, cats or sharks.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Are birds ominvores, carnivores or herbivores?

    A:

    Depending on the species, a bird may be a carnivore, an omnivore or an herbivore. Larger birds with sharp talons are more likely to be carnivores, while small birds with beaks built for cracking nuts are more likely to be herbivores.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Are flamingos endangered?

    A:

    According to Sea World, as of 2014 no species of the flamingo is considered endangered under the U.S. Endangered Species Act. There are four different types of flamingos in America and only two in Europe.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore