Q:

How high can a frog jump?

A:

The distance a frog can jump varies by species. Frogs jump horizontally, not vertically. North American Bullfrogs jump a distance of 3 to 7 feet at a time. Some frogs jump a distance of more than ten times their length.

Frogs use three distinctive parts of their bodies to jump: forelegs, hind legs and thighs. High levels of force enable frogs to jump. Their muscles are passively flexible, so they can be stretched and elongated during the jumping process.

Generally, frogs have smooth skin, while toads have textured skin. All toads are frogs, but not all frogs are toads. There are about 2,000 species of frogs in existence.


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