Q:

How do horses communicate?

A:

Horses communicate through body language. Horses grazing in a pasture can pick up on another horse's emotions through subtle changes in movement or stance. A dominant horse lifts its head with its chin up and its ears folded back to tell another horse to move. The dominant horse lunges forward if the other horse does not follow the orders.

A dominant horse may bite another horse in the shoulder or hindquarters if the horse does not follow the dominant horse's body language. Dominant horses push against other horses when they want them to move. If a horse does not move, the dominant horse increases the amount of pressure until the horse gives in to the pressure.

Horses change their facial expressions to communicate. Horses use their eyes and ears to express certain emotions. A horse often pins back its ears when it is frustrated.

Horses use their tails to communicate fear or excitement. When a horse hides its tail between its legs, it indicates fear. On the other hand, a horse with a spinning tail means that it is angry or annoyed at something. This is different from a horse using its tail to swat away insects. Horses raise their tails when they are excited as well.

Learn More
Sources:

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What is a group of horses called?

    A:

    A group of horses is called a "team" or a "harras." If all the horses in a group are colts, "rag" can be used, and a group of ponies is called a "string."

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Where are horses found?

    A:

    According the Bureau of Land Management, feral horses can be found in Arizona, Nevada, Wyoming, Montana and North Carolina. Modern horses are descended from species that originated in Eastern Europe, Asia and Mongolia, and wild specimens still live in these regions.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Where did horses originally come from?

    A:

    The first species of horse arose in Asia, Europe and North America between 45 and 60 million years ago, during the period known as the Eocene. Partial fossils of this diminutive species were discovered in England in 1841 by the paleontologist Richard Owen, who referred to it as Hyracotherium, or "mole beast."

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Do horses have hair or fur?

    A:

    Horses have hair and not fur. Although there is no difference between hair and fur, a horse's coat is called hair because it is not dense enough for humans to use as garments.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore