Q:

Are horses ruminants?

A:

Horses are not ruminants, although they are capable of digesting cellulose and other plant-based materials despite lacking a forestomach. The fermentation of plant matter is done in the large intestine, which in horses is massive and complex.

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Horses are odd-toed ungulates within the family equidae, which includes zebras and donkeys. The fight-or-flight response of a horse is adept in addition to its sense of balance, making the horse an animal that is quick to flee. Horse breeds are divided into three categories: hot bloods, cold bloods and warm bloods. Hot bloods are used for speed and endurance, while cold bloods are better at slower-paced, heavier work. Warm bloods are a balance of the two, more suitable for activities such as riding.

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Related Questions

  • Q:

    How do horses protect themselves?

    A:

    A horse primarily escapes danger by fleeing. However, when cornered, the animal can lash out physically, relying on bucking, biting, kicking, rearing and striking to drive predators away. A horse generally prefers to be kept somewhere open where it can run away if necessary.

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  • Q:

    Where are horses found?

    A:

    According the Bureau of Land Management, feral horses can be found in Arizona, Nevada, Wyoming, Montana and North Carolina. Modern horses are descended from species that originated in Eastern Europe, Asia and Mongolia, and wild specimens still live in these regions.

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  • Q:

    Are horses herbivores?

    A:

    Horses are herbivores because they eat primary producers. Primary producers are organisms that are able to produce their own food using chemical energy or energy from the sun.

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  • Q:

    What do horses eat?

    A:

    Horses primarily eat hay and grass, with grains like corn or oats added for extra calories. Horses are also provided with salt, either added into a concentrate mix of grains, flax seed, beet pulp, bran and molasses or separately as a salt block in the pasture. Horses also receive treats in the form of apples, carrots and sugar. Some horses occasionally enjoy a bite of meat.

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