Q:

Do jaguars have predators?

A:

The jaguar has no natural predators, according to the Rainforest Alliance. Humans are the main threat for jaguars, through poaching and loss of natural habitat.

Jaguars live in many different habitats, though they are most often found in jungles and forests. Loss of the natural habitats has led to an increase in contact with humans, who kill jaguars for their furs, although this practice is not as common as it once was. The Rainforest Alliance states that there are now roughly only 15,000 jaguars left in the wild. Jaguars also hunt some of the same species as humans, furthering the danger of human contact.


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