Q:

How do I keep frogs out of my swimming pool?

A:

Quick Answer

To prevent frogs from entering a swimming pool, use saltwater barriers or install fencing around the pool. Regular maintenance to remove any frogs in the water is also necessary. Fencing can be installed in a weekend, but regular maintenance is required to keep frogs out of the pool if the infestation persists after a barrier is installed.

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Full Answer

  1. Place salt around the pool

    Salt barriers prevent frogs from entering the pool temporarily. To make a salt barrier, mix 2 pounds of salt in 3 gallons of water, and stir until the salt is dissolved. Pour the mixture around the perimeter of the pool as needed to deter frogs.

  2. Install a permanent barrier

    To prevent nonclimbing frogs from entering the pool area, install a wire fence, and place 1/8-inch hardware cloth along the base of the fence. The hardware cloth should be buried at least 4 inches deep, and it should be at least 20 inches above ground level to deter frogs.

  3. Remove frogs daily

    Frogs may still enter the pool after installing deterrents. Open the pool cover if necessary, and use a bucket or skimmer to remove any frogs that are in the pool. Check the pool on a daily basis until the infestation is well-controlled using other methods.

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