Q:

What is a large group of turkeys called?

A:

Quick Answer

The correct term for a group of turkeys is a rafter, although many people refer to a group of turkeys as a flock. Male turkeys are called toms, and female turkeys are called hens. Baby turkeys are called poults.

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What is a large group of turkeys called?
Credit: U.S. Department of Agriculture CC-BY 2.0

Full Answer

The wild turkey is one of the largest birds in North America. Wild turkeys live in open fields and woodlands and build their nests on the ground. Wild turkeys can fly short distances and reach speeds of up to 55 mph, while domesticated turkeys are unable to fly. Wild turkeys can also reach speeds of up to 25 mph when they are running.

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