Q:

What is the life span of a peacock?

A:

According to National Geographic, the peacock lives up to 20 years in the wild. Adult peacocks weigh between 8.75 and 13 pounds, with a tail span of 5 feet.

Peacocks are colorful pheasants. Their typical blue and green tail feathers are called coverts. These coverts fan out, creating the peacock's distinctive look. This fan is displayed for mating and courtship. Females select their mate based on the quality, color and size of the male's fan.

While both males and females are called peacocks, only the males are true peacocks. Females are properly called peahens. Both male and female peacocks are often referred to as peafowl.


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