Where do ligers live?
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Q:

Where do ligers live?

A:

Quick Answer

Ligers, products of the mating between a male lion and a tigress, live only in captivity. This is largely because the behaviors and habitats of lions and tigers differ. Ligers typically grow larger than either parent, with some individuals weighing over 1,000 pounds.

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Full Answer

The liger exhibits faint stripes reminiscent of a tiger and the overall tan coloring of a lion. Rosettes, which are inherited through the lion, are also possible. Ligers enjoy swimming and are sociable. Although previously believed to be sterile, some ligers have produced viable offspring. Many zoos have banned the breeding of ligers due to the stress it places upon the mother tiger.

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