Q:

How long is a frog's tongue?

A:

Quick Answer

A frog’s tongue is about a third of the length of its entire body. In comparison, if a human had the same size tongue it would reach the belly button.

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How long is a frog's tongue?
Credit: : David Maitland Oxford Scientific Getty Images

Full Answer

Unlike a human tongue that attaches at the back of the throat, a frog’s tongue attaches near the back of the jaw. When not in use, the tongue is folded up on the base of the mouth with the tip of the tongue pointing towards the back of the throat. A gland inside the mouth produces a sticky substance that allows the frog to accurately flip out the tongue and capture its prey.

Sources:

  1. hamline.edu

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