Q:

How long does it take maggots to form after eggs are laid?

A:

Quick Answer

Fly eggs hatch into maggots, technically known as larvae, within a day after being laid. Maggots then feed for three to five days before pupating.

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How long does it take maggots to form after eggs are laid?
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Full Answer

Maggots molt several times during their feeding period.

Maggots have a wide variety of uses. Fishermen use them as bait. Live maggots are also used for medical purposes, such as eating dead tissue. Maggots are used in forensic science to calculate an approximate time of death.

Flies reproduce rapidly due to their short life cycle and the large batches of eggs females lay. This can lead to maggot infestation. Maggots can cause myiasis in livestock and humans.

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Related Questions

  • Q:

    What do maggots look like?

    A:

    Maggots of the common house fly look like small, pale worms. Maggots emerge from their eggs, which look like grains of rice, within 24 hours of being laid. For about five days, the fly larva, or maggot, eats extensively to store energy for its metamorphosis into a fly.

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  • Q:

    How long do maggots live?

    A:

    The lifespan of maggots, or fly larvae, varies based on the temperature. At optimum temperatures of 95 to 100 degrees Fahrenheit, maggots complete their development and become adults in four to 13 days. At lower temperatures of 53 to 62 degrees Fahrenheit, development takes 14 to 30 days.

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  • Q:

    How are flies born?

    A:

    Flies hatch from eggs and grow into larvae. They shift into the pupa phase before growing into adults. The birth cycle of a fly takes 10 days.

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  • Q:

    Where do flies live during winter?

    A:

    Regular house flies survive as larvae during winter by living in the decaying flesh of animals or other dead and decaying organisms that provide a suitable habitat during the colder months. While house flies survive by living in decaying flesh and maturing into adults when the weather becomes warmer, other flies, such as stone flies or may flies, survive the winter by living in water beneath the ice of streams, ponds and lakes.

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