Q:

Are there both male and female ladybugs?

A:

Quick Answer

There are both male and female ladybugs. They are called ladybugs regardless of whether or not they are male or female.

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Full Answer

Ladybug is a slang term for the name lady beetle. They are harmless to humans and help farmers by eating garden pests such as aphids.

Scientists believe that ladybugs gather in large groups to diapause, the insect version of hibernation. They can live for up to nine months off the reserves they store. When the temperature rises to 55 degrees Fahrenheit, ladybugs emerge from diapause.

When threatened, ladybugs secrete a fluid that gives them a bad taste. They may also play dead to protect themselves.

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Related Questions

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    What kinds of ladybugs are poisonous?

    A:

    There are more than 5,000 species of ladybugs and they are only poisonous to smaller animals such as birds and lizards. Ladybugs are not considered poisonous to humans. However, people that accidentally consume a ladybug find them foul-tasting.

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    How do ladybugs reproduce?

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    Ladybugs mate by the male mounting the female of the species and deposit his sperm. The males are able to hang on to the females' hard wing coverings if the female tries to resist.

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    How do ladybugs breathe?

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    What do ladybugs eat?

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    Ladybugs eat aphids, cabbage moths, mites and other tiny insects. Because of their appetite for plant-eating pests, ladybugs are a beneficial component for any garden and act as a natural pesticide.

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