Q:

What is a male ladybug called?

A:

Regardless of sex, male and female ladybugs are collectively referred to as just that — ladybugs. The name "ladybug" is an Americanized version of the European name for the same sort of beetle: "ladybird."

The term ladybird has been used in Europe for centuries, although the scientific name for the ladybug is Coccinella septempunctata. It is said to have been named for the Virgin Mary, whom some call "Our Lady." The ladybug is at the heart of the children's nursery rhyme, "Ladybird, Ladybird, Fly Away Home."

Because ladybugs can eat up to 5,000 aphids in their lifetimes, they are often raised commercially and sold to farmers and gardeners.


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