Q:

How many babies does a guinea pig have at once?

A:

Quick Answer

Guinea pigs generally have between one and four babies, or pups, in each litter, according to Guinea Lynx. However, on rare occasions, a mother guinea pig, also called a sow, can have seven or more pups in a litter.

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Full Answer

The gestation period for guinea pigs lasts between 59 and 73 days. Sows become sexually mature and able to breed at around four weeks old, and they are capable of getting pregnant again just hours after giving birth. Because of this, it is recommended that all male guinea pigs, also called boars, be removed from a cage containing a new guinea pig mother and her litter.

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    Where do guinea pigs live?

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    Guinea pigs are native to South America and were first put into use by human society in what is now Boliva and Peru near the mountain range known as the Andes. Guinea pigs have historically been used as a source of food, as aides in religious ceremonies meant to detect and extract illnesses and as pets kept in the household.

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    Guinea pigs bite as a means of communication or as a response to fear and pain. They may also nip accidentally when seeking to get a treat, and they bite each other as part of dominance behavior.

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    Can guinea pigs eat apples safely?

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    Guinea pigs can safely eat apples. Because apples are acidic and contain natural fruit sugars, they should be fed infrequently and in small amounts. An appropriate portion is one slice of apple once or twice weekly.

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