Q:

How many Komodo dragons are left in the world?

A:

Quick Answer

There are roughly 3,000 to 5,000 Komodo dragons left in the world, all of which live on the islands of Komodo, Gila Motang, Rinca and Flores in Indonesia, outside of the ones in captivity. This low population qualifies Komodo dragons as an endangered species.

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Full Answer

Komodo dragons have lived in the Lesser Sunda Islands of Indonesia for millions of years, but humans have only known of their existence for roughly 100 years. Due to poaching, human encroachment and natural disasters, they have become endangered. Komodo dragons can reach up to 10 feet in length and weigh 300 pounds, making them the heaviest lizards on the planet.

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Related Questions

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    How fast do bearded dragons grow?

    A:

    Bearded dragons typically grow an average of one to a few inches each month for the first year of their life. While some bearded dragons can grow up to 2 feet in length, the maximum size of these animals in captivity is limited by the size of their environment. Bearded dragons achieve sexual maturity between one and two years of age.

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  • Q:

    In which biome does the Komodo dragon live?

    A:

    Komodo dragons live in tropical savannas. They are only found naturally on Komodo Island and a few other islands in Indonesia and are the largest member of the lizard species.

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  • Q:

    Who are the predators of the Komodo dragon?

    A:

    Komodo dragons are the top predators in their range, and adults do not suffer predation by any species. Young Komodo dragons sometimes fall prey to predatory mammals, birds and other Komodo dragons. Juveniles live in trees as protection until they are large enough to defend themselves.

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  • Q:

    What is a baby Komodo dragon called?

    A:

    Baby Komodo dragons are called hatchlings. As they grow a bit older, they don't have a special name; they are just referred to as babies.

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