Q:

How many sloths are left in the world?

A:

Quick Answer

According to a 2012 study by the Zoological Society of London, there are likely fewer than 100 pygmy three-toed sloths remaining in the wild. The population census was conducted during a nine-day expedition to Escudo Island, the only place in the world the species is found.

  Know More

Full Answer

Roughly the size of a newborn human baby, the pygmy three-toed sloth is the smallest and slowest of sloths in the world. Not recognized as a distinct species until 2001, the pygmy is one of the most endangered mammals in the world. Their demise is attributed to the destruction of the mangrove forests on their island off the coast of Panama.

Learn more about Marsupials

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What are some facts about sloths?

    A:

    Sloths sleep for up to 20 hours per day. When they are awake, they move so slowly that algae grows on their fur. According to National Geographic, some scientists believe that the slow movements and algae camouflage make the sloths less vulnerable to predators that rely on vision for hunting, such as hawks or cats.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is the life span of a koala?

    A:

    Koalas live 13 to 18 years in the wild. In captivity, koalas have lived over 20 years. Females usually outlive males, who sometimes fall from trees while fighting.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How many orangutans are left in the world?

    A:

    There are fewer than 50,000 orangutans living in the wild, while as recently as 100 years ago, 230,000 orangutans inhabited the forests of Southeast Asia. Scientists recognize two different species of orangutan, one hailing from Borneo and the other from Sumatra. Approximately 41,000 Borneo orangutans remain in the wild, while only 7,500 Sumatran orangutans exist.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How many grizzly bears are left?

    A:

    According to the National Wildlife Foundation, there are an estimated 32,500 grizzly bears remaining in the wild in the United States as of 2014. Of these, 31,000 are in Alaska, and the remainder are spread throughout the United States and Canada.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore