Q:

What is the maximum speed of a leopard?

A:

Quick Answer

The highest speed that a leopard can reach is 60 kilometers or 37 miles per hour. Differences in height and weight can cause a leopard's maximum speed to be less.

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What is the maximum speed of a leopard?
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Full Answer

Leopards are very agile and have been known to climb trees to store away captured prey. Not only can leopards run very fast, but they also have an ability to leap up to 6 meters and jump as far as 3 meters. By nature, leopards are carnivorous creatures that thrive on smaller mammals for food consumption. The animal is found throughout Central Asia and Africa, but some species of leopards are said to be endangered.

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    What does a leopard look like?

    A:

    Leopards are big light-colored cats with prominent dark spots, called rosettes. Leopards are powerfully built and capable of hauling prey up trees to prevent scavenging or theft by other predators. They can be up to 6 feet long and may weigh up to 176 pounds.

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    How fast can a bear run?

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    What is the life cycle of a leopard?

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    Leopards begin life after a 90 to 105 day gestation period, then nurse from their mothers for up to three months. They reach sexual maturity at 2.5 years and have a lifespan of between 10 and 15 years when in the wild.

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    What eats the Amur leopard?

    A:

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