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How much does a killer whale weigh?

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Quick Answer

According to Encyclopædia Britannica, a male killer whale can reach a length of more than 26 feet and weigh more than five tons. Females can reach 23 feet and weigh significantly less.

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How much does a killer whale weigh?
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Full Answer

The killer whale, also known as the orca, is a cosmopolitan member of the dolphin family. With black and white coloration, a powerful build and sharp teeth, it is an apex predator of oceans all over the world. As a social animal, killer whales live in small groups called pods with less than 40 members in each pod. Interestingly, diet differs between killer whale populations, with some groups preferring a more traditional staple of fish and cephalopods, and others preferring to prey on mammals, including other dolphins and whales.

Sources:

  1. britannica.com

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