Q:

How does red algae move?

A:

Quick Answer

The red algae are nonmotile, which means they do not move on their own. Found all over the world in mostly marine but also freshwater habitats, red algae depend upon the movement of the water in which they dwell.

Know More
How does red algae move?
Credit: WILLIAM WEST / Staff AFP Getty Images

Full Answer

Red algae, also known as rhodophyta, which means "red plant", have from 5,000 to 10,000 species, some of which are seaweeds. They derive their red color from a number of pigments, the most important of which is phycoerythrin. They obtain their energy through photosynthesis. Because the red pigmentation is able to absorb blue light waves, they can survive deeper in the ocean than other forms of algae. Some red algae, called coralline algae, contribute to the formation of coral reef structures by secreting calcium carbonate. Red algae reproduce sexually. Water currents carry male gametes to female sex organs, called carpogonium, where they become attached.

Red algae are consumed not only by fish, crustaceans and other marine animals, but also by humans. They are rich in vitamins and protein and easy to cultivate. The Japanese call them nori and use them to wrap sushi. In Britain they are known as laver and are eaten cold as a salad, baked into bread, fried or mixed with oatmeal. Red algae called Irish Moss are used in puddings, ice cream, preserves, and even beer and wine.


Is this answer helpful?

Similar Questions

  • Q:

    How does an octopus move?

    A:

    An octopus uses several methods to move through the ocean. An octopus in a hurry uses jet propulsion by rapidly contracting its water-filled mantle, the muscular sac that encloses its gills and body organs. The contracting mantle forces water rapidly through a funnel at its base, propelling the octopus in the opposite direction. Slower movement is achieved by using all eight limbs to maneuver along the sea bottom or around obstacles.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What are some freshwater algae eaters?

    A:

    Freshwater algae eaters include a variety of shrimps, snails, and algae eating fish. The best freshwater algae eater for a particular tank depends on the type of freshwater habitat, the current aquatic residents and the aquarium owner’s taste.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How do starfish move?

    A:

    Starfish move using tube feet on their undersides. Their feet use seawater to form a hydraulic system. The starfish's vascular system is open and relies on the water around it rather than internal pressure. Starfish can only move outside of water for a short time. A starfish left out of water for too long loses its ability to move, and it dies if not quickly returned to the ocean.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How do cnidarians move?

    A:

    Cnidarians that move do so by flexing weak, gelatinous muscles in the body walls of their bells against a pressurized hydrostatic skeleton. However, many types of cnidarians, such as mature anemones and corals, move little if at all, although juvenile stages may take a more mobile form to disperse individual organisms. Even the more mobile types, such as jellyfish, move only weakly and generally drift as plankton with the current.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore