Q:

How do you get rid of bumblebees?

A:

Quick Answer

The best way to get rid of bumblebees is to relocate the nest. Killing the bees, which are integral to crop pollination, is illegal in many areas.

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Full Answer

Bumblebee nests usually contain about 50 bees. The nest should be moved at night, when the bees do not fly. Once the bees become quiet after dark, a wooden box, such as a bird's nest box, should be placed over the bee nest. All holes should be sealed with tape or stuffed with a flexible material to prevent the bees from coming out. The box should be moved to a point that is at least 5 feet above ground, at which point the holes should be reopened.

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