Q:

What do saltwater hermit crabs eat?

A:

Hermit crabs are omnivores and eat almost anything available. In captivity, they may eat raw fish, cooked chicken and a variety of vegetables, fruits and nuts.

While hermit crabs kept in captivity are generally referred to as land crabs, they still originated in the oceans and are therefore technically saltwater crabs. Although land crabs do not need an abundance of ocean water, they still require a small amount of salt water to survive. Because of this need for salt water, hermit crabs cannot breed in captivity. In fact, all pet hermit crabs were caught in the wild before being sold.

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    What do sea hermit crabs eat?

    A:

    According to The Hermit Crab Patch, hermit crabs are omnivorous scavengers. In captivity, they can be fed a range of plant and meat varieties, but the size of their meals needs to be properly adjusted to their size, according to PawNation.

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  • Q:

    What do saltwater crabs eat?

    A:

    Saltwater crabs are primarily carnivorous, preying on animals that live on or near the ocean floor. The most common species of ocean-dwelling crabs feast largely on small fish, worms, squid, snails and animal matter found on the ocean floor. Most crabs also eat their own species, some going as far as to deliberately trap them, according to USA Today.

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    What are some facts about hermit crabs?

    A:

    Hermit crabs are marine or terrestrial invertebrates called decapods that mostly live underwater, with a few tropical species living on the land. They are named for their habit of living in scavenged shells, which they must replace regularly to accommodate their growing bodies. Hermit crabs are scavengers that subsist on a variety of organic material.

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    What does it mean when a hermit crab won't go back into its shell?

    A:

    Hermit crabs may abandon their shells for a variety of reasons. Uncomfortable shells, low or high temperatures and humidity levels, stress and molting are the most common explanations.

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