Q:

Do sharks make noises?

A:

Quick Answer

Sharks do not have specialized organs for producing sound, so any noise a shark makes is an unintended product of its daily life, such as when it swims or eats. The draughtsboard shark can inflate itself and produces a barking sound when it fills with air instead of water.

Know More

Full Answer

Sharks are cartilaginous fish related to skates and rays. Over 470 species of shark exist. Sharks are an ancient and extremely successful group of animals, having existed for over 400 million years. Each shark has multiple rows of replaceable teeth. Sharks live in all oceans of the world, although some species, such as the bull shark, are capable of surviving in fresh water.

Learn more about Sharks

Related Questions

  • Q:

    Is a shark a mammal?

    A:

    A shark is not considered a mammal. Sharks are considered members of the paraphyletic group of organisms that contain gills, or in other words, fish.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is a small shark called?

    A:

    The smallest shark in the world is known as the dwarf lantern shark. The shark is found off the northern shores of South America and rarely exceeds more than 8 inches in length.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How do you fight a shark?

    A:

    If you are attacked by a shark, it is important to fight back and get out of the water as soon as possible, but there are also important tips to learn to avoid a shark encounter. Sharks generally don’t like to eat humans. When sharks bite humans it is usually a “hit and run,” where they bite the human out of curiosity and swim away. This usually happens in shallow water and is rarely lethal.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How does a shark protect itself?

    A:

    The 400 living species of sharks defend themselves in a variety of ways that vary from species to species. Large species, such as great whites, basking sharks and whale sharks derive protection from their size; they are too big to represent potential prey for any species except humans. Other species, such as carpet sharks, rely on their flattened morphology and cryptic coloration to avoid the detection of predators.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore