Where do sheep live?
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Q:

Where do sheep live?

A:

Quick Answer

Domestic sheep are raised all over the world and are one of the most common herd animals in history. The first domestic sheep were located in the Middle East and Central Asia, but farmers all around the world raise them today, in virtually every environment imaginable.

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Full Answer

Domestic sheep are used largely for their wool, though herds in Great Britain and New Zealand are also cultivated for their meat. Not common at the average supermarket in the United States, mutton is a much leaner meat than beef or pork, though lamb is more often used by many restaurants and amateur chefs.

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Related Questions

  • Q:

    How long is a sheep pregnant?

    A:

    Female sheep, technically called ewes, are pregnant for 138 to 149 days. The average gestation period is 146 to 147 days. There are no visible signs of pregnancy until about six weeks before birth.

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  • Q:

    What is a female sheep called?

    A:

    A female sheep is called a "ewe," a docile creature of high intelligence. Female sheep weigh between 150 and 200 pounds, and reach sexual maturity around 6 months depending on the breed, the type of nutrition available and the season in which they were born.

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  • Q:

    Where did sheep originate from?

    A:

    Sheep were first domesticated over 10,000 years ago by people in ancient Mesopotamia. It is theorized that domesticated sheep were bred from the wild sheep species, the mouflon, based on their similar number of chromosomes.

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  • Q:

    How long are sheep pregnant for?

    A:

    Sheep are pregnant from 142 to 152 days with the average gestation period being 147 days. Breed differences have an effect on the length of gestation, making it somewhat shorter or longer than the average. For instance, Finnsheep have shorter pregnancies than Rambouillet sheep.

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