Q:

Which smells do mice hate?

A:

Quick Answer

Mice are repelled by the smell of cat urine, peppermint and Bounce dryer sheets. Cat urine repels mice because they equate it with death. The peppermint in tea bags, sprays and oils deters mice because of its strong smell. Bounce dryer sheets are the only brand reputed to repel mice.

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Full Answer

Mothballs, which are small balls made out of pesticide, can have an unwanted effect on small children, pets and other beneficial animals when used as a mouse deterrent. Keep mice out of the home without using chemicals by sealing their entry points with steel wool and caulking. Mice can't chew through steel.

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    Do mice eat dead mice?

    A:

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    What smells do rats hate?

    A:

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    What do mice like to eat?

    A:

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