Q:

Do tigers roar?

A:

Quick Answer

Tigers roar. In most cases, tigers do not roar at other species of animals; rather, tigers roar at other tigers that are not close by in an effort to garner attention. For this reason, before a tiger attacks another species of animal, the tiger typically does not roar. Instead, the tiger hisses in such a situation.

  Know More
Do tigers roar?
Credit: Todd Huffman CC-BY-SA 2.0

Full Answer

Tigers are the largest members of the cat family. As is the case with the domesticated house cat, the pattern of a tiger's fur is also present on its skin. After a hunt and kill, the male tigers permit females and cubs to eat first, which is the opposite of how lions feed.

Learn more about Large Cats
Sources:

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What are tigers afraid of?

    A:

    Tigers are generally at the top of the food chain and classified as apex predators, so they aren't afraid of any other animal. One exception to this is the case of tigers living in the range of particular bear species, as they sometimes are killed by bears when competing for food or disputing a kill.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What big cat cannot roar?

    A:

    Cheetahs and snow leopards are two big cats that cannot roar, though they make other big cat noises such as chuffing and growling. The sounds a big cat can make depends on certain bone anatomy in the animal's throat, and neither the cheetah nor the snow leopard have the proper anatomical features to allow roaring to occur.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is a group of tigers called?

    A:

    A group of several tigers is called a streak or an ambush. A female tigress and her cubs qualify as a streak. Tigers in captivity, forced to dwell together due to their habitat's size restrictions, are also called a streak.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Why are there no tigers in Africa?

    A:

    Scientists have differing opinions on why tigers were not native to Africa, but all are speculation. University of Minnesota professor J.L. David Smith said, "The best explication is time." Geographic boundaries and glaciers proved too big a barrier to cross in the evolutionary process of the tiger.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore