Q:

What is a tortoiseshell cat's lifespan?

A:

According to the American Society for the Protection of Animals, cats, including tortoiseshell cats, tend to live between 13 and 17 years. They can live to be over 20 years old with proper care.

Know More

Full Answer

Tortoiseshell is a color, not a specific breed of cats. For this reason, tortoiseshell cats have the same average lifespan as any other cat. Color does not affect the lifespan of a cat, so a tortoiseshell cat can expect to live 13 to 17 years or longer. Paying close attention to health, including regular vaccinations and checkups with a veterinarian, can help ensure a long lifespan for a tortoiseshell cat.

Learn more in Cats
Sources:

Related Questions

  • Q:

    Where do cats live?

    A:

    Domestic cats typically live in homes or urban areas while feral cats live in forests, grasslands, tundras and wetlands, and big cats live in rainforests, deserts and in temperate climate zones. Where cats live depends primarily on the species. Domestic cats live in virtually every part of the world and primarily live indoors, which means that they can survive wherever humans live.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How old do cats live?

    A:

    Cats on average live into their teens, with a life expectancy between 13 and 18 being typical for most breeds, barring other variables. Among these variables are whether the cat is kept indoors, and whether it is neutered. Certain breeds are more prone to genetic illness.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is the best cat food for indoor cats?

    A:

    The best food for an indoor cat must contain a large amount of animal based proteins and fats. According to WebMD Pets, cats benefit from low carbohydrates and meat-based diets.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What are some cute cat names for girl cats?

    A:

    According to a 2012 study by Vet Street, the top 10 female cat names include: Lola, Stella, Izzy, Zoey, Lulu, Luna, Nala, Penny, Ruby and Willow. 95 percent of the female cat names studied were human names, as opposed to descriptive names, such as Whiskers or Snowball.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore