Q:

Do whales have hair?

A:

Quick Answer

Whales have hair, as all species of whales are aquatic mammals. Instead of having scales, like most other marine animals, whales have a fine layer of hair over their bodies.

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Do whales have hair?
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Full Answer

In order for an animal to be classified as a mammal, it must have certain physiological characteristics. The most notable feature is hair on the body. The animal must also be warm-blooded, breathe with a set of lungs instead of gills, have mammary glands, give birth to live babies rather than eggs, have three distinguished middle ear bones and have a region of the brain called the neocortex. Some other marine mammals include dolphins, walruses and seals.

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Related Questions

  • Q:

    Are whales mammals?

    A:

    All whales are mammals. Whales, along with dolphins and porpoises, are cetaceans, meaning that they are part of the order Cetacea, one of the taxonomic branches of marine mammals.

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  • Q:

    Did whales have legs?

    A:

    Ancestors of modern-day whales, such as Pakicetus, were amphibious cetaceans and possessed legs. Ambulocetus, a descendant of Pakicetus, had shorter legs more suited for aquatic life in addition to paddle-shaped feet.

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  • Q:

    Do whales have bones?

    A:

    Whales, as mammals, are vertebrates and have internal skeletons composed of bone. Whales live in all oceans and seas with the exception of the Caspian and Aral seas.The first whales are believed to have appeared approximately 50 million years ago, based on fossil records.

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  • Q:

    Are whales carnivores or omnivores?

    A:

    Whales are carnivores, meaning that they subsist entirely on a diet of meat. Whales are part of a larger order of animals called cetaceans, which also includes dolphins and porpoises. All cetaceans are carnivorous animals.

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