Q:

Where do wolves sleep?

A:

Quick Answer

While the common belief is that wolves sleep cuddled up to one another in wolf dens, they actually sleep out in the open regardless of weather conditions. Wolves establish their sleeping spots by circling the area prior to lying down.

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Where do wolves sleep?
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Full Answer

All wolves travel in packs. Mother and father wolves are referred to as alphas. The alphas hunt for food for their young. They also choose den sites and territory for the pack. Wolves communicate with one another through howls and whistles. The theory that wolves howl at the full moon is based on the fact that wolves tend to howl more frequently when the dark nights are lighter due to extra moonlight.

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Related Questions

  • Q:

    Why do wolves howl?

    A:

    Wolves howl to communicate with other wolves. Often, this communication serves to signal the pack to gather around, let the rest of the pack know where a single wolf is and warn outside wolves away.

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  • Q:

    How do wolves communicate?

    A:

    Wolves communicate through body language, vocalizations and their sense of smell. Vocalizations often take the form of howling, barking or whimpering, and they are an important part of wolf culture. Wolves primarily convey messages through body language and posturing. One of the important things they communicate is social status. Wolves assert their dominance by barring their teeth, flattening their ears or by carrying a raised tail.

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  • Q:

    How do wolves survive?

    A:

    Wild wolves demand three essential things for their survival. The first two are simple: a proper source of food and an agreeable habitat. The third requirement, human acceptance of their presence, or toleration, has proven more complicated.

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  • Q:

    Are there wolves in Indiana?

    A:

    As of August 2014, Indiana does not have a wild population of gray or red wolves. Wolves were present in what is now Indiana in colonial times, but they were almost extinct in the 48 contiguous states by 1960. Only a small population in northern Minnesota survived.

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