Q:

Do woolly worms turn into butterflies?

A:

Woolly worms turn into moths, not butterflies. The woolly worm is the larva of the Isabella tiger moth, a moth of medium size that has yellow-orange and cream-colored wings with black spots. It inhabits the entire United States as well as northern Mexico and the southern third of Canada.

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Full Answer

The woolly worm, also known as the woolly bear or the banded woolly bear, is a reddish-brown caterpillar with black bands on each end. It has a fuzzy appearance due to a covering of short, stiff hairs. The woolly worm's body is composed of 13 segments. According to legend, narrower reddish-brown sections of the caterpillar mean that the following winter can be expected to be harsher.

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