Q:

What is a young frog called?

A:

Quick Answer

A frog is first a tadpole and then a froglet before becoming an adult frog. It takes between 3 to 4 months for a frog to go through the complete growth cycle and become an adult frog.

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Full Answer

Frogs lay eggs, and when the eggs hatch a frog is called a tadpole. The tadpole has poorly developed gills, a tail and a mouth. It generally stays near the shoreline of lakes or streams, depending on where the female frog lays her eggs.

After a couple of months, the tadpole will be larger, have legs and resemble an adult frog with a tail. A young frog, or froglet, is officially no longer a tadpole at around 12 weeks.

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