1800's Slang?

Answer

The 18000s slang was totally different from the current slang. Slang keeps changing with the times and trends. Most of the books and films that are about the early 19th century try to incorporate some of the phrases that were used back then. For instance, ace-high was the slang phrase used to refer to first class or respected. Other words included bazoo which meant mouth, Doxology works referred to a church, fetch was used to mean give or bring and the list goes on.
Q&A Related to "1800's Slang?"
Boodle. (First known in 1833) A boodle of men waited in the saloon for their whiskey.
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read some mark twain
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North of England (Newcastle area) 1850 Muckle - big Gully - knife Netty - toilet Lavvy - toilet (v v) Yem - home Wor - our Lass - girl Lassie - little girl Lad - boy Laddie - little
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Worthless goods; stuff or rubbish: "Look at your hands. And look at your mouth. What is that truck? (Mark Twain)
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