Describe the force that holds two atoms together in an ionic bond?

Answer

Ionic bonds are chemical bonds between two atoms in a molecule that have opposite electromagnetic charges. Because both atoms want to achieve stable octate structures, the atom with low ionization energy will lose an electron or electrons from its outermost valence shell and the atom with high ionization energy freely accepts the electron or electrons. A electrostatic attraction between the atoms is formed and the two atoms wish to maintain a stable octate structure, so the bond is strong. Atoms that lose electrons are called cations and have a positive charge, and atoms that accept electrons are called anions and have a negative charge. The atoms align with these opposite charges at opposite sides of the bond, like a magnet.
Reference:
Q&A Related to "Describe the force that holds two atoms together..."
an ionic compound
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_is_the_force_that_h...
If i recall correctly it is the electrostatic force of attraction between protons of one atoms and electrons of another atom and vise versa. Source(s) Year 10 student.
http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=200911...
A chemical bond is any force of attraction that holds two atoms or
http://www.chacha.com/question/what-kind-of-force-...
An ionic bond (or electrovalent bond) is a type of chemical bond that can often form between metal and non-metal ions (or polyatomic ions such as ammonium) through electrostatic attraction
http://uk.answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=200...
Explore this Topic
Ionic bonds are chemical bonds between two atoms in a molecule that have opposite electromagnetic charges. Because both atoms want to achieve stable octate structures ...
Chemical bonds are the forces that hold different atoms or ions together. Three basic types of bonds are ionic bond, coordinate covalent bond and convents bond ...
A covalent bond is one of the main types of bonds between atoms. To describe how covalent bonds hold two atoms together, one would say that they share electrons. ...
About -  Privacy -  AskEraser  -  Careers -  Ask Blog -  Mobile -  Help -  Feedback © 2014 Ask.com