Examples of Rising Intonation?

Answer

In English, rising intonation signifies a question. Examples of rising intonation include questions that can be answered with a simple yes or no. Questions like this could ask if you are cold, if you are hot, and if you are tired. They can also ask if you slept well, if you're leaving now, if someone is at home, if you think someone is handsome, if someone has arrived, if it is warm outside, and more.
Reference:
1 Additional Answer
Ask.com Answer for: Examples of Rising Intonation
Intonation is the rising and falling of vocal pitch in speech. In English, rising intonation phrase-finally often accompanies questions, or situations where speakers are unsure. Declarative statements have intonation that falls phrase-finally.
Q&A Related to "Examples of Rising Intonation?"
Rising intonation is most commonly found when a question is being asked. The intonation at the end allows someone to differentiate between a question and a statement. Unfortunately,
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_are_the_examples_of...
Rising intonation in English indicates a question. Falling intonation indicates a certainty.
http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=200906...
Rising action is a gradual raising of the tension in the story using danger,
http://www.chacha.com/question/what-is-an-example-...
Situations that decrease the system resistance such as overcleaning the fabric filter bags or opening the fan inlet or outlet dampers would cause the airflow rate and the fan motor
http://www.epa.gov/apti/bces/module5/fans/performa...
Explore this Topic
In English, rising intonation signifies a question. Examples of rising intonation include questions that can be answered with a simple yes or no. Questions like ...
Rising intonation is most commonly found when a question is being asked. The intonation at the end allows someone to differentiate between a question and a statement ...
Rising intonation is most commonly found when a question is being asked. The intonation at the end allows someone to differentiate between a question and a statement ...
About -  Privacy -  AskEraser  -  Careers -  Ask Blog -  Mobile -  Help -  Feedback © 2014 Ask.com