How Do Horses Protect Themselves?

Answer

Horses have a natural instinct to run when their in danger. If horses have to protect themselves, their best weapon are the legs. Those powerful legs will ward off any threat.
Q&A Related to "How Do Horses Protect Themselves"
They rear, buck, trumpet, and chase to threaten first. They will also lower their heads and wag them from side to side to threaten. If neither of those work, then they will bite,
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/How_do_horses_protect_th...
Conchologists of America lists oysters as a bivalved mollusk. The soft-bodied animal is protected with an exterior skeleton consisting of two shells derived from calcium in the oyster's
http://www.ehow.com/facts_6867421_do-oysters-prote...
Cockatoos have two main means of escaping predators: They tend to fly in flocks, which provides them some protection, as there is safety in numbers. All members of the parrot family
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/How_do_Cockatoos_protect...
with there feet wings and other body parts
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/How+do+eagles+protect
1 Additional Answer
Ask.com Answer for: How Do Horses Protect Themselves
Horse
Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Mammalia Order: Perissodactyla Family: Equidae Genus: Equus Species: Equus caballus
The Horse (Equus caballus) is a sizeable ungulate mammal, one of the seven modern species of the genus Equus. It has long played an important role in transport, whether ridden or used for pulling a chariot, carriage... More »
Explore this Topic
Horses have a natural instinct to run when their in danger. If horses have to protect themselves, their best weapon are the legs. Those powerful legs will ward ...
Seals protect themselves by moving from sea to land if being pursued by a predator. Seals will also bite to protect themselves and their young. In addition they ...
Gorillas protect themselves by living in groups that are protected by a large, dominant male and by being secretive. Additionally, gorillas are skilled climbers ...
About -  Privacy -  Careers -  Ask Blog -  Mobile -  Help -  Feedback  -  Sitemap  © 2014 Ask.com