How Do Icebergs Float?

Answer

Icebergs float in water because the liquid form of water is denser than the solid form. Also, icebergs contain a lot of air. Icebergs are made with freshwater. You can find more information here: http://www.livescience.com/mysteries/061012_icebergs_float.html
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1 Additional Answer
Icebergs float in water due to a couple of different reasons. Icebergs are composed of fresh water, which is less dense than seawater. Because the icebergs are placed on top of salt water, they float. Icebergs also contain a large number of tiny, trapped air bubbles. These air bubbles also help to make the icebergs float on top of the seawater.
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Icebergs float in water because the liquid form of water is denser than the solid form. Also, icebergs contain a lot of air. Icebergs are made with freshwater ...
Icebergs float non water because ice is less dense than water. Water as a liquid is slightly denser than as a solid. They also contain a lot of air hence less ...
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