How Much Dry Pasta Equals Cooked Pasta?

Answer

When you cook dry pasta it absorbs much of the water you cook into it. The weight of the dry pasta generally doubles when you cook it. For example, half of a cup of dry pasta equals one cup of cooked pasta. A good rule of thumb is two ounces of dry pasta per serving of pasta you would like to cook. To measure the weight, put a bowl on your kitchen scale and tare it. Add the dry pasta until it reads the desired amount.
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1 Additional Answer
Depending on the size and shape of the pasta, the quantity may differ between cooked and uncooked. Generally when pasta cooks, it doubles in quantity. So if you cook 1/2 cup of elbow macaroni it will equal 1 cup when fully cooked. For long pasta, such as spaghetti, a handful (3/4 inch in diameter) will equal approximately 2 cups when cooked.
Q&A Related to "How Much Dry Pasta Equals Cooked Pasta?"
That is really dependent upon the type or shape of the pasta, and also whether it is whole grain or not. The rule of thumb is that the pasta will double upon cooking.
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1. Fill a stockpot or large saucepan about 3/4 full with cold water, depending on how much pasta you want to cook. 2. Place the pot on a burner and heat on high heat until the water
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9 cups.
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2 ounces of dry is equal to 1 cup cooked. 12
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